We’ve got a ton of new books in!! :) Be the first to come over and check them out!!

Independence Lost by Kathleen DuVal Over the last decade, award-winning historian Kathleen DuVal has revitalized the study of early America’s marginalized voices. Now, in Independence Lost, she recounts an untold story as rich and significant as that of the Founding Fathers: the history of the Revolutionary Era as experienced by slaves, American Indians, women, and British loyalists living on Florida’s Gulf Coast.

While citizens of the thirteen rebelling colonies came to blows with the British Empire over tariffs and parliamentary representation, the situation on the rest of the continent was even more fraught. In the Gulf o Mexico, Spanish forces clashed with Britain’s strained army to carve up the Gulf Coast, as both sides competed for allegiances with the powerful Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek nations who inhabited the region. Meanwhile, African American slaves had little control over their own lives, but some found opportunities to expand their freedoms during the war. 

Independence Lost reveals that individual motives counted as much as the ideals of liberty and freedom the Founders espoused: Independence had a personal as well as national meaning, and the choices made by people living outside the colonies were of critical importance to the war’s outcome. DuVal introudces us to the Mobile slave Petit Jean, who organized militias to fight the British at sea; the Chickasaw diplomat Payamataha, who worked to keep his people out of war; New Orleans merchant Oliver Pollock and his wife, Margaret O’Brien Pollock, who risked their own wealth to organize funds and garner Spanish support of the American Revolution; the half-Scottish Creek leader Alexander McGillivray, who fought to protect indigenous interests from European imperial encroachment; the Cajun refugee Amand Broussard, who spent a lifetime in conflict with the British; and Scottish loyalists James and Isabella Bruce, whose work on behalf of the British Empire placed them in grave danger. Their lives illuminate the fateful events that took place along the Gulf of Mexico and, in the process, changed the history of North America itself.

Adding new depth and moral complexity, Kathleen DuVal reinvigorates the story of the American Revolution. Independence Lost is a bold work that fully establishes the reputation of a historian who is already regarded as one of her generation’s best.

Gilgamesh: A Graphic Novel by Andrew Winegarner Before the Bible and legendary figures like Hercules, King Arthur, and Beowulf, there was Gilgamesh. As the king of Uruk, a city in ancient Mesopotamia, Gilgamesh protected his people from harm, battling a multitude of fierce demons with the steadfast help of his brother, Enkidu.

But Gilgamesh’s reign faced the ultimate challenge from the power-hungry goddess Ishtar, who proposed marriage to only be unceremoniously spurned by Gilgamesh. Ishtar’s rage led Gilgamesh to his greatest battle, a battle that shook Gilgamesh to his core and led him to travel further than any other man – to the  land of the gods on a quest to find immortality.

Written down on cuneiform tablets nearly five thousand years ago, Gilgamesh’s  story was originally recorded in the form of an epic poem. In this bold retelling of the ancient legend – presented for the first time in graphic novel form – graphic novelist Andrew Winegarner revitalizes the ultimate adventure story. His illustrations breathe new life into the story of humanity’s first hero, and the result is a page-turning take on the world’s oldest epic poem.

A Thousand Lives: The Untold Story of Jonestown by Julia Scheeres In 1954, a pastor named Jim Jones opened a church in Indianapolis called Peoples Temple Full Gospel Church. He was a charismatic preacher with idealistic beliefs, and he quickly filled his pews wiht an audience eager to hear his sermons on social justice. As Jones’s behavior became erratic and his message more ominous, his followers leaned on each other to recapture the sense of equality that had drawn them to his church. But even as the congregation thrived, Jones made it increasingly difficult for members to leave. By the time Jones moved his congregation to a remote jungle in Guyana and the U.S. government began to investigate allegations of abuse and false imprisonment in Jonestown, it was too late. 

A Thousand Lives is the story of Jonestown as it has never been told. New York Times bestselling author Julia Scheeres drew from tens of thousands of recently declassified FBI documents and audiotapes, as well as rare videos and interviews, to piece together an unprecedented and compelling history of the doomed camp, focusing on the people who lived there.

The people who built Jonestown wanted to forge a better life for themselves and their children. In South America, however, they found themselves trapped in Jonestown and cut off from the outside world as their leader goaded them toward committing “revolutionary suicide” and deprived them of food, sleep, and hope. 

Vividly written and impossible to forget, A Thousand Lives is a story of blind loyalty and daring escapes, of corrupted ideals and senseless, haunting loss.

Queen of the Shadows by Sarah J. Maas Everyone Celaena Sardothien loves has been taken from her. But she’s at last returned to the empire – for vengeance, to rescue her once-again glorious kingdom, and to confront the shadows of her past . . .

She will fight for her cousin, a warrior prepared to die for her. She will fight for her firend, a young man trapped in an unspeakable prison. And she will fight for her people, enslaved to a brutal king and awaiting their lost queen’s triumphant return. 

The fourth volume in the New York Times bestselling series continues Celaena’s epic journey and builds to a passionate, agonizing crescendo that might just shatter her world.

Dream Team by Jack McCallum Acclaimed sports journalist Jack McCallum delivers the untold story of the greatest team ever assembled: the 1992 U.S. Olympic Men’s Basketball Team. As a writer for Sports Illustrated, McCallum enjoyed a courtside seatfor the most exciting basketball spectacle on Earth, covering the Dream Team from its inception to the gold medal ceremony in Barcelona. Drawing on fresh interviews with the players, McCallum provides the definitive account of the Dream Team phenomenon. He offers a behind-the-scenes look at the controversial selection process. He takes us inside the team’s Olympic suites for late-night card games and bull sessions where superstars like Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, and Larry Bird debated the finer points of basketball. And he narrates a riveting account of the legendary intrasquad scrimmage that pitted the Dream Teamers against one another in what may have been the greatest pickup game in history. In the twenty years since the Dream Team first captivated the world, its mystique has only grown. Dream Team vividly re-creates the moment when a once-in-a-millennium group of athletes came together and changed the future of sports – one perfectly executed fast break at a time.

Through the Language Glass by Guy Deutscher The debate is ages old. Where does language come from? Is it an artifact of our culture or written in our very DNA? In recent years, the leading linguists have seemingly settled the issue: all languages are fundamentally the same, and the particular language we speak does not shape our thinking in any significant way. Guy Deutscher says they’re wrong. From Homer to Darwin, from Yale to the Amazon, and through a strange and dazzling history of the color blue, Deutscher argues that our mother tongues do indeed shape our experiences of the world. Audacious, delightful, and provocative, Through the Language Glass is destined to become a classic of intellectual discovery.

America Bewitched by Owen Davies The infamous Salem trials are etched into the consciousness of modern America, the human toll a reminder of the dangers of intolerance and persecution. The refrain ‘Remember Salem!’ was invoked frequently over the ensuing centuries. As time passed, the trials became a milepost measuring the distance America had progressed from its colonial past, its victims now the righteous and their persecutors the shamed. Yet the story of witchcraft did not end as the American Enlightenment dawned – a new, long, and chilling chapter was about to begin. 

Witchcraft after Salem was not just a story of fireside tales, legends, and superstitions, it continued to be a matter of life and death, souring the American dream for many. We know of more people killed as witches between 1692 and the 1950’s than were executed before it. Witches were part of the story of the decimation of the Native Americans, and the immigrant experience; they were embedded in the religious and social history of the country. Yet the history of American witchcraft between the eighteenth and the twentieth century also tells a less traumatic story, one that shows how different cultures interacted and shaped each other’s languages and beliefs.

This is therefore much more than the tale of one persecuted community; it opens a fascinating window on the fears, prejudices, hopes, and dreams of the American people as their country rose from colony to superpower.

Muck City by Bryan Mealer The black “muck” that surrounds Belle Glade, Florida, once built an empire for Big Sugar on the backs of roving destitute migrants. Many of these were children who honed their skills along the field rows and started one of the most legendary football programs in America. The Glades Central Raiders have sent an extraordinary number of players to the National Football League – twenty-seven since 1985, with five of those drafted in their first round.

The industry that gave rise to the town also spawned the chronic poverty, teeming migrant ghettos, and violence that cripples futures before they can ever begin. Muck City is the story of quarterback Mario Rowley, whose dream is to win a championship for his deceased parents and quiet the ghosts that haunt him; head coach Jessie Hester, the town’s first NFL star, who returns home to “win kids, not championships”; and Jonteria Williams, who must build her dream of becoming a doctor in one of the poorest high schools in the nation. Muck City is an engrossing portrait of a community mired in a shameful past and uncertain future, but with the fierce will to survive, win, and escape to a better life.

Theodore Roosevelt by Lewis L. Gould Sportsman, Naturalist, Warrior, President. There are so many sides to Theodore Roosevelt that it is easy to overlook one of his most enduring contributions to American public life; the use of fame to fuel his political career. 

In this concisely written, enlightening book, presidential historian, Lewis L. Gould goes beyond the “bully pulpit” stereotypes to reveal how Roosevelt used his celebrity to change American politics. Based on research gleaned from the personal papers of Roosevelt and his contemporaries, Theodore Roosevelt recaptures its subject’s bold activism and irrepressible, larger-than-life personality. Beginning with his privileged childhood in New York City, the narrative traces his election to the New York Assembly, where he quickly rose through the ranks of the Republican Party. It is here that he first applied his shrewd ability to keep himself in the spotlight – a skill that served him well as commander of a volunteer regiment (dubbed “Roosevelt’s Rough Riders”) in the Spanish-American War. Gould shows how Roosevelt rode a wave of popular acclaim at the war’s end, assuming the governorship of New York and serving as president from 1901 to 1909. While covering his major accomplishments as chief executive, including his successes as a trust-buster, labor mediator, and conservationist, Gould explains how fame both sustained and limited Roosevelt when he ran for president in 1912 and opposed Woodrow Wilson’s policies during World War I.

Theodore Roosevelt delivers the most insightful look yet at a pioneer of political theater – a man whose vigorous idealism as a champion of democracy serves as a counterpoint to the cynicism of today’s political landscape.

NFL Football: A History of an American Pastime by Richard C. Crepeau Founded as an obscure sports body, the National Football League has grown into a multi-billion-dollar colossus and cultural phenomenon at the center of American sports.

In this wide-ranging history, Richard C. Crepeau synthesizes scholarship and media sources to give the reader an inside view of the television contracts, labor issues, and other forces that shaped the league off the field and all too often determined a team’s success on it. He devotes significant attention to Commissioner Pete Rozelle’s leadership during an explosive period of growth fueled in part by pro football’s conquest of Monday nights, the merging of celebrity and athletics, and the transformation of the Super Bowl into a mid-winter spectacle wiht record TV ratings. Crepeau also delves into the league’s masterful exploitation of media from radio to the internet, its abiltiy to get taxpayers to subsidize team stadiums, and its success in delivering an outlet for experiencing vicarious violence to a public uneasy over the changing rules of masculinity.

Probing and learned, NFL Football tells an epic American success story peopled by larger-than-life figures and driven by ambition, money, sweat, and dizzying social and technological changes.

Islam: A Short Guide to the Faith In this straightforward and authoritative collection of fifteen essays – each by a different, specialized expert in the field – readers will encounter all the major elements of Islam, including its history, its beliefs, its practices, and its interactions, notably with Christianity, Judaism, and the modern world. Islam: A Short Guide to the Faith will inform and enlighten all who wish to better understand this increasingly influential world religion.

No Animals Were Harmed by Peter Laufer, Ph.D. Following the success of The Dangerous World of Butterflies and Forbidden Creatures, investigative journalist Peter Laufer returns with his third book in a trilogy that explores the way humans interact with animals. The attack of a trainer at Sea World by a killer whale in February 2010 sparked his examination of the controversial role animals have played throughout the ages in the human arenas of entertainment and sports.

When it comes to using animals for our own entertainment, Laufer asks: What’s okay and what’s not?

Homing pigeons? Sled dogs? Dancing bears? Elephant polo? Teaching Spot new tricks?

From the Romans throwing Christians to the lions to cock-fighting in present-day California, from abusive Mexican circuses to the thrills of a Hungarian counterpart, and from dog training to shooting strays in the Baghdad streets, Laufer looks at the ways peoople have used animals for their pleasure. Travel with Laufer as he encounters intriguing people and places and contemplates the line that separates animal use from abuse.

 

Football Nation by Susan Rayburn Football Nation: Four Hundred Years of America’s Game from the Library of Congress is an unprecedented look at football from its early days in colonial America to the professional and college game in the twenty-first century.

This visually stunning social and cultural history contains nearly 400 images, many rare or never before published, including memorabilia, cartoons, fine art, and game photographs. The lively text examines how the game acquired distinct American style, survived attempts to kill it, and became the country’s dominant sport, while coping with wartime, social change, intensifying fan participation, and corporate influence.

Throughout the book, illustrated features explore the history of the fight song, tailgating, and cheerleading; how Hollywood has portrayed the game and its players; the long-running role of women in football; and the impact of game-changing personalities from pioneer Walter Camp to Caoch Vince Lombardi to contemporary player agents. (Indeed, no other football book includes such a diverse range of figures as Abigail Adams, Nathan Hale, Confederate general James Longstreet, Al Capone, Queen Elizabeth II, and Peyton Manning.) Quite simply, this book reveals how the United States came to be Football Nation.

 

Soldiers in the Army of Freedom by Ian Michael Spurgeon It was 1862, the second year of the Civil War, though Kansans and Missourians had been fighting  over slavery for almost a decade. For the 250 Union soldiers facing down Rebel irregulars on Enoch Toothman’s farm in Butler, Missouri, this was no battle over abstract principles. These were men of the First Kansas Colored Infantry, and they were fighting for their own freedom and that of their families. They belonged to the first black regiment raised in a northern state, and the first black unit to see combat during the Civil War. Soldiers in the Army of Freedom is the first published account of this largely forgotten regiment, in particular, its contribution to Union victory in the trans-Mississippi theater of the Civil War. As such, it restores the First Kansas Colored Infantry to its rightful place in American history.

Composed primarily of former slaves, the First Kansas Colored saw major combat in Missouri, Indian Territory, and Arkansas. Ian Michael Spurgeon draws upon a wealth of little-known sources – including soldiers’ pension applications – to chart the intersection of race and military service, and to reveal the regiment’s role in countering white prejudices by defying stereotypes. Despite naysayers’ bigoted predictions – and a merciless slaughter at the Battle of Poison Spring – these black soldiers proved themselves as capable as their white counterparts, and so helped shape the evolving attitudes of leading politicians, such as Kansas senator James Henry Lane and President Abraham Lincoln. A long-overdue reconstruction of the regiment’s remarkable combat record, Spurgeon’s book brings to life the men of the First Kansas Colored Infantry in their double desperate battle against the Confederate forces and skepticism within Union ranks.

 

Guys Read: Terrifying Tales edited by Jon Scieszka Mysterious tattoos appearing on a boy’s body. An imaginary friend that’s not so imaginary. An old blind woman who is tired of being bothered. 

Be afraid, be very afraid of Terrifying Tales, the sixth volume in the Guys Read Library of Great Reading. Eleven masters of suspense have come together to bring you a bone-chilling collection of original ghost stories perfect for sharing around the campfire, reading under the covers with a flashlight, and scaring your friends’ pants off. 

Compiled and edited by kid-lit madman Jon Scieszka, Guys Read: Terrifying Tales is a creepy, fun read (if you’re brave enough, that is).

 

Letters to a New School Teacher edited by Jeanne Devlin Letters to a New School Teacher was inspired by the slefless legacy of the American school teacher. Who of us cannot name at the very least one teacher who made a difference in our life – and in doing so, made a difference in America itself.

So ultimately, we posed one simple question: What would America’s best teachers like to tell a new, young, aspiring, or struggling teacher if they could?

The answer can be found in these pages, where the U.S. Teachers of the Year for 2011 – 2012 share their single best piece of advice for a new teacher.

 

Letters to a New School Teacher, Vol. 2 In 2011, U.S. Teachers of the Year from each state contributed to a little book of advice that came to spotlight the dedication, creativity, and passion American teachers bring to their work.

In this sequel to Letters to a New School Teacher: Advice from America’s Best Educators, the new crop of Teachers of the Year for 2012 – 2013 from across the United States share their single best piece of advice for a new school teacher.

Volume I was called “a collection of practical advice and wisdom” . . . “for any rookie teacher who wants to go that extra mile” by Midwest Book Review’s Education Shelf.

Volume II promises to deliver all that and more for teachers who aspire to be the best they can be – whether they be a recent education graduate, a new teacher, or a veteran educator.

 

Donut Dolly by Joann Puffer Kotcher Donut Dolly puts you in the Vietnam War face down in the dirt under a sniper attack, inside a helicopter being struck by lightening, at dinner next to a commanding general, and slogging through the mud along a line of foxholes. You see the war through the eyes of one of the first women officially allowed in the combat zone as a civillian noncombatant. Initially a pacifist, Joann Puffer Kotcher transforms into a combat veteran faced with life or death decisions.

When Kotcher left for Vietnam in 1966, she was fresh out of the University of Michigan witha  year of teaching, and a year as an American Red Cross Donut Dolly in Korea. All she wanted was to go someplace exciting. In Vietnam, she visited troops from the Central Highlands to the Mekong Delta, from the South China Sea to the Cambodian border. At four duty stations, she set up recreation centers and made mobile visits wherever commanders requested. That included Special Forces Teams in remote combat zone jungles. She brought reminders of home, thoughts of a sister or the girl next door. Officers asked her to take risks because they believed her visits to the front lines were important to the men. Every Vietnam veteran who meets her thinks of her as a brother-at-arms.

Donut Dolly is Kotcher’s personal view of the war, recorded ina  journal kept during her tour, day by day, as she experienced it. It is a faithful representation of the twists and turns of the turbulent, controversial time. While in Vietnam, Kotcher was once abducted; dodged an ambush in the Delta; talked with a true war hero in a  hospital who had charged a machine gun; and had a conversation with a prostitute. She found answers to the questions: What is it really like in a war? What will a soldier say to a girl while sitting in a bunker with shells flying overhead? What did the men think about the war? Why would a man risk his life to save another? The answers will surprise you.

A rare account of an American Red Cross volunteer in Vietnam, Donut Dolly will appeal to those interested in the Vietnam war, to those who have interest in the military, and to women aspiring to go beyond the ordinary.

 

The Gods of Prophetstown by Adam Jortner It began with a total eclipse of the sun. In 1806, a Shawnee known as Lalawauthika (roughly meaning “Loudmouth”) proclaimed himself Tenskwatawa (“The Open Door”), a spiritual leader in direct contact with the Master of Life. Those who disbelieved him, he warned, “would see darkness come over the sun.” Not long after, the sun went black. Ironically, Tenskwatawa’s resulting prestige was greatly enhanced by his mortal enemy, governor of the Indiana Territory and future American president William Henry Harrison. If he truly is a prophet, Harrison publicly taunted, then let him produce a miracle. And Tenskwatawa did just that.

In The Gods of Prophetstown, Adam Jortner provides a gripping account of the conflict between Tenskwatawa and Harrison, who finally collided in 1811 at a place called Tippecanoe. Though largely forgotten today, the Battle of Tippecanoe determined the future of westward expansion and influenced the impending War of 1812. Jortner weaves together dual biographies of the opposing leaders. In the five years between the eclipse and the battle, Tenskwatawa used his spiritual leadership to forge a political pseudo-state, together with his twin brother Tecumseh. Harrison, meanwhile, built a power base in Indiana, rigging the elections and maneuvering for higher position Rejecting received wisdom, Jortner sees nothing as preordained – Native Americans were not inexorably falling toward dispossession and destruction. Deeply rooting his account in a generation of scholarship that has revolutionized Indian history, Jortner places the religious dimension of the struggle at the fore, recreating the spiritual landscapes trod by each side The climactic battle, he writes, was as much a  clash of gods as of men.

Written with profound insight and narrative verve, The Gods of Prophetstown recaptures a forgotten turning point in American history in time for the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Tippecanoe.

 

Born Survivors by Wendy Holden Among the millions of Holocaust victims sent to Auschwitz II – Birkenau in 1944, Priska, Rachel, and Anka each pass through its infamous gates witha  secret. Strangers to oen another, they are newly pregnant, and facing an uncertain fate without their husbands. Alone, scared, and with so many loved ones already lost to the Nazis, these young women are privately determined to hold on to all they have left: their lives and those of their unborn babies.

That the gas chambers ran out of Zyklon B just after the babies were born, before they and their mothers could be exterminated, is just one of several miracles that allowed them all to survive and rebuild their lives after World War II. Born Survivors follows the mothers’ incredible journey – first to Auschwitz, where they each came under the murderous scrutiny of Dr. Josef Mengele; then to a German slave-labor camp, where, half-starved and almost worked to death, they struggled to conceal their condition; and finally, as the Allies closed in, their hellish seventeen-day train journey with thousands of other prisoners to the Mauthausen death camp in Austria. Biographer Wendy Holden details the courage and kindness of strangers, including guards and civilians, which helped save these women and their children.

Sixty-five years later, the three “miracle babies” meet for the first time at Mauthausen for the anniversary of the American liberation. United by their remarkable experiences of survival against all odds, they come to consider each other “siblings of the heart.” In Born Survivors, Holden brings all three stories teogether for the first time, to mark their seventieth birthdays and the seventieth anniversary of the ending of the war.

A heart-stopping account of how three mothers and their newborns fought to survive the Holocaust, Born Survivors  is also a life-affirming celebration of our capacity to care and love amid inconceivable cruelty.

 

The Storm of the Century by Al Roker In this gripping narrative history, Al Roker from NBC’s Today and the Weather Channel vividly examines the deadliest natural disaster in American history – a haunting and inspiring tale of tragedy, heroism, and resilience that is full of lessons for today’s new age of extreme weather.

On the afternoon of September 8, 1900, two-hundred-mile-per-hour winds and fifteen-foot waves slammed into Galveston, the booming port city on Texas’s Gulf Coast. By dawn the next day, the city that hours earlier had stood as a symbol of America’s growth and expansion  was now gone. Shattered, grief-stricken survivors emerged to witness a lavel of destruction never before seen: Eight thousand corpses littered the streets and were buried under the massive wreckage. Rushing water had lifted buildings from their foundations, smashing them into pieces, while wind gusts had upended steel girders and trestles, driving them through house ewalls and into sidewalks. No race or class was spared its wrath. In less than twenty-four hours, a single storm had destroyed a major American metropolis – and awakened a nation to the terrifying power of nature.

Blending an unforgettable cast of characters, accessible weather science and deep historical research into a sweeping and dramatic narrative, The Storm of the Century brings this legendary hurricane and its aftermath into fresh focus. No other natural disaster has ever matched the havoc caused by the awesome mix of winds, rain, and flooding that devastated Galveston and shocked a young, optimistic nation on the cusp of modernity. Exploring the impact of the tragedy on a rising country’s confidence – the trauma of the loss and the determination of the response – Al Roker illuminates the United States’s character at the dawn of the “American Century,” while also underlining the fact that no matter how mighty they may become, all nations must respect the ferocious potential of our natural environment.

 

The Fate of Ten by Pittacus Lore This is the day we’ve been training for. The day we’ve all feared. We’ve spent years fighting the Mogadorians in secret, never letting the world know the truth about our war. But now all of that has changed.

Their ships have invaded Earth. If we can’t find a way to stop them now, humans could suffer the same fate as our people: annihilation.

I wish I could be with John on the front lines of the battle in New York City, but I am hoping – praying – that the key to our survival lies within the Sanctuary. This is where the Elders always meant for us to go when we came of age. This was their plan for us. There is a power that has been hidden here beneath the earth for generations. A power that could save the world or destroy it. And now we have awoken it.

They killed Number One in Malaysia.

Number Two in England.

Number Three in Kenya.

And Number Eight in Florida.

I am Number Six – but our numbers don’t matter anymore.

Because now we are not the only ones with Legacies.

 

Quiet Strength by Tony Dungy with Nathan Whitaker When Tony Dungy led the Indianapolis Colts to victory in Super Bowl XLI – and made history as the first African American coach to win the big game – millions of people, amazed by the success of his quiet, authoritative leadership style, wondered: how does he get it done?

In the pages of this fascinating memoir, Tony Dungy reveals the secrets to his success – principles, practices, and priorities that have kept him on track despite overwhelming obstacles, including firings, stereotypings, and the tragic loss of a child. His thoughts on leading, succeeding, and attaining true significance will inspire you to take a long, hard look at the things that really matter in your own life.

 

The Devil’s Workshop by Alex Grecian Scotland Yard’s Murder Squad faces the most shocking case of its existence, in the extraordinary new historical thriller from the author of the acclaimed national bestsellers The Yard and The Black Country.

London, 1890: Five vicious murderers have escpaed from prison, part of a plan gone terribly wrong, and now it is up to Walter Day, Nevil Hammersmith, and the rest of Scotland Yard’s Murder Squad to hunt down the convicts before the men can resume their bloody spree. But they might already be too late. The killers have retribution in mind, and one of them is heading straight for a member of the Murder Squad – and his family.

And that isn’t even the worst of it. During the escape, the killers stumbled upon the location of another notorious murderer, one thought gone for good but now prepared to join forces with them.

Jack the Ripper is loose in London once more.

 

Shattering the Glass by Pamela Grundy and Susan Shackelford Reaching back over a century of struggle, liberation, and gutsy play, Shattering the Glass is a sweeping chronicle of women’s basketball in the United States. Offering vivid portraits of forgotten heroes and contemporary stars. Pamela Grundy and Susan Shackelford provide a broad perspective on the history of the sport, exploring its close relationship to concepts of womanhood, race, and sexuality, and to efforts to expand women’s rights.

Extensively illustrated and drawing on original interviews with players, coaches, administrators, and broadcasters, Shattering the Glass presents a moving, gritty view of the game on and off the court. It is both an insightful history and an empowering story of the generations of women who have shaped women’s basketball.

 

Gilded by Christina Farley Sixteen-year-old Jae Hwa Lee is a Korean-American girl with a black belt, a deadly proclivity with steel-tipped arrows, and a chip on her shoulder the size of Korea itself. When her widowed dad uproots her to Seoul from her home in L.A., Jae thinks her biggest challenges will be fitting in to a new school and dealing with her dismissive Korean grandfather. Then she discovers that a Korean demigod, Haemosu, has been stealing the soul of the oldest daughter of each generation in her family for centuries. And she’s next.

But that’s not Jae’s only problem.

There’s also Marc. Irresistible and charming, Marc threatens to break the barriers around Jae’s heart. As the two grow closer, Jae must decide if she can trust him. But Marc has a secret of his own – one that could help Jae overturn the curse on her family for good. It turns out that Jae’s been wrong about a lot of things: her grandfather is her greatest ally, even the tough girl can fall in love, and Korea might just be the home she’s always wanted.

 

Silvern by Christina Farley Jae Hwa Lee is ready to forget about immortals and move on with her life. Until Kud, god of darkness, sends an assassin to kill her.

Jae escapes with the knowledge that Kud is seeking the lost White Tiger Orb, and joins forces with a legendary organization, the Guardians of Shinshi, to find the orb before Kud can steal it and discover what it’s capable of. Jae knows she’ll need her friends for this fight, but they have problems of their own; her best friend Michelle doesn’t yet fully understand the dangers of the Spirit World; boyfriend Marc is spendingmore and more time away from her, training to become a Guardian of Shinshi; and Marc hates the fellow trainee assigned to help them: the oddly riveting – and absurdly handsome – Kang-dae. They set out together on a harrowing journey that will take Jae into the darkest corners of the Spirit World and the real world.

But Kud is a stronger and more devious god than Jae ever imagined. Jae is soon painfully reminded that by making an enemy of Kud, she has placed her closest friends in danger, and must decide how much she can bear to sacrifice to defeat one of the most powerful immortals in all of Korea.

 

Instant Replay By Jerry Kramer and Dick Schaap This classic sports book takes readers inside the 1967 season of the Green Bay Packers, following that storied team from training camp to their dramatic victory in Super Bowl II.

Candid and often amusing, Jerry Kramer describes from a player’s perspective a bygone era of sports, filled with blood, grit, and tears. No game better exemplifies this period than the classic “Ice Bowl” conference championship game between the Packers and the Dallas Cowboys, which Kramer, who made the crucial block in the climactic play, describes in thrilling detail. We also get a rare and insightful view of the Packers’ legendary leader, coach Vince Lombardi.

As vivid and engaging as it was when it was first published, Instant Replay is an irreplaceable reminder of the glory days of pro football.

 

 

 

Girl in Reverse by Barbara Stuber When Lily was three, her mother put her up for adoption, then disappeared without a trace. Or so Lily was told. Lily grew up in her new family and tried to forget her past. But with the Korean War raging and the fear of “commies” everywhere, Lily’s Asian heritage makes her a target. For Lily, war is everywhere – the dinner table, the halls at school, and especially within her own skin.

Then her brainy little brother, Ralph, finds a box containing a baffling jumble of broken antiques – clues to her past left by her “Gone Mom.” Lily and Ralph attempt to match these fragments with rare Chinese artifacts at the art museum, where she encounters the artistic genius Elliot James. Elliot attracts and infuriates Lily – especially  when he calls their first kiss “undimensional.” With the help of Ralph and Elliot, will Lily summon the courage to confront her own remarkable creation story?

 

 

The Undisputed Guide to Pro Basketball History  The history of basketball has always belonged to champions like the Celtics, the Lakers, and the Bulls. Yet the game’s history cuts much deeper than that. The bottom line, the record books and retired jerseys, can never fully do justice to this wild, chaotic, and energetic game. In between the championships, there’s the sight of Earl Monroe, spinning and cajoling his way to every corner of the court; or Allen Iverson, driving headlong into players twice his size.

The real history of the game is not in its championships, which are indisputable, but in the personalities of its heroes, which are, at least, undisputed. It’s in the larger-than-life pathos of Wilt, the secret ties that bind Larry Bird to the flashy ABA, and Michael Jordan when he flew a little too high. From the prehistoric teachings of Dr. James Naismith to pioneering superstars such as LeBron James and Kevin Durant, FreeDarko retells the history of the game in fresh, arresting detail. You’ll never see roundball the same way again.

 

A Season on the Brink by John Feinstein Twenty-five years after it spent sixteen weeks atop the New York Times bestseller list, A Season at the Brink remains the most celebrated basketball book ever written. Granted unprecedented access to legendary coach Bob Knight and the Indiana Hoosiers during the 1985-86 season, John Feinstein saw and heard it all – practices, team meetings, strategy sessions, and midgame huddles – as the team worked to return to a championship form. The result is an unforgettable chronicle that not only captures the drama and pressure of big-time college basketball but also paints a vivid portrait of a complex, brilliant coach as he walks the fine line between genius and madness.

 

The Korean War by Bruce Cumings For Americans, it was a discrete conflict lasting from 1950 to 1953. But for the Asian world the Korean War was a generations-long struggle that still haunts contemporary events. With access to new evidence and secret materials from both here and abroad, including an archive of captured North Korean documents, Bruce Cumings reveals the war as it was actually fought. He describes its origin as a civil war, preordained long before the first shots were fired in June 1950 by lingering fury over Japan’s occupation of Korea from 1910 to 1945. Cumings then shares the neglected history of America’s post-World War II occupation of Korea, reveals untold stories of bloody insurgencies and rebellions, and tells of the United States officially entering the action on the side of the South, exposing as never before the appalling massacres and atrocities committed on all sides.

Elegantly written and blisteringly honest, The Korean War is, like the war it illuminates, brief, devastating, and essential.

 

Fourth and Long by John U. Bacon In search of the sport’s old ideals amid the roaring flood of hypocrisy and greed, bestselling author John U. Bacon embedded himself in four programs – Penn State, Ohio State, Michigan, and Northwestern – and captured football’s oldest, biggest, most storied league, the Big Ten, at its tipping point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1781: The Decisive Year of the Revolutionary War by Robert L. Tonsetic “There’s a reassuring solidity to battlefield analysis made by a historian who’s seen actual battlefields. 1781 saw the effective end of large-scale British warring in America, but the principal strength of Tonsetic’s book is that he never takes the victory at Yorktown for granted as so many Revolution writers do; he never writes “backward” from the surrender of Cornwallis, nor should he: Americans need periodic reminders that they could just as easily have lost.” – Open Letters Monthly

 

When the Game Was Ours by Larry Bird and Earvin Magic Johnson with Jackie MacMullan From the moment these two legendary players took the court on opposing sides, they engaged ina  fierce physical and psychological battle. In Celtic green was Larry Bird, the hick from French Lick, with laser-beam focus, relentless determination, and a deadly jump shot, a player who demanded excellence from everyone around him and whose caustic wit left opponents quaking in their high-tops. Magic Johnson was Mr. Showtime, a magnetic personality with all the right moves. Young, indomitable, he was a pied piper in purple and gold. And he burned with an inextinguishable desire to win.

Their uncommonly competitive relationship came to symbolize the most thrilling rivalry in the NBA – East vs. West, physical vs. finesse, old school vs. Showtime, even white vs. black. Each pushed the other to greatness, and together Bird and Johnson collected eight NBA Championships and six MVP awards, helping to save a floundering NBA. At the start they were bitter rivals, but along the way they became lifelong friends.

With intimate detail, When the Game Was Ours transports readers to an electric era and reveals for the first time the inner workings of two players dead set on besting each other. It is a compelling portrait of two giants of the game during professional basketball’s best times.

 

Brotherband: Slaves of Socorro by John Flanagan Hal and his fellow Herons have returned home to Skandia after defeating the pirate captain Zavac and reclaiming Skandia’s most prized artifact, the Andomal. With their honor restored, the Herons turn to a new mission: tracking down an old rival turned bitter enemy. Tursgud – leader of the Shark Brotherband and Hal’s constant opponent – has turned from a bullying youth into a pirate and slave trader. After Tursgud captures twelve Araluen villagers to sell as slaves, the Heron crew sails into action . . . with the help of one of Araluen’s finest Rangers.

 

Eisenhower in War and Peace by Jean Edward Smith In this extraordinary volume, Jean Edward Smith presents a portrait of Dwight D. Eisenhower that is as full, rich, and revealing as anything ever written about America’s thirty-fourth president. Here is Eisenhower the young dreamer, charting a course from Abilene, Kansas, to West Point and beyond. Drawing on a wealth of untapped primary sources. Smith provides new insight into Ike’s maddening apprenticeship under Douglas MacArthur. Then the whole panorama of World War II unfolds, with Eisenhower’s superlative generalship forging the Allied path to victory. Smith also gives us an intriguing examination of Ike’s finances, details his wartime affair with Kay Summersby, and reveals the inside story of the 1952 Republican convention that catapulted him to the White House.

Smith’s chronicle of Eisenhower’s presidential years is as compelling as it is comprehensive. Derided by his detractors as a somnambulant caretaker, Eisenhower emerges in Smith’s perceptive retelling as both a canny politician and a skillful, decisive leader. He managed not only to keep the peace, but also to enhance America’s prestige in the Middle East and throughout the world.

Unmatched in insight, Eisenhower in War and Peace at last gives us an Eisenhower for our time – and for the ages.

 

The Perfect Nazi by Martin Davidson This is the confession that Martin Davidson received from his mother upon the death of his demanding, magnetic grandfather Bruno Langbehn. The Perfect Nazi is Davidson’s exploration of his family’s darkest secret. 

As Davidson dove into his research, drawing on an astonishing cache of personal documents as well as eyewitness accounts of this historical period, he learned that Bruno’s story moved lockstep in time with the rise and fall of the Nazi party: from his upbringing in a fiercely military environment amid the aftermath of World War I, to his joining the Nazi party in 1926 at the age of nineteen, more than six years before Hitler came to power, to his postwar involvement with the Werewolves, the gang of SS stalwarts who vowed to fight on after the defeat of Nazism. 

Davidson realized that his grandfather was in many ways the “perfect Nazi,” his individual experiences emblematic of the generation of Germans who would plunge the world into such darkness. But he also realized that every fact he uncovered was a terrible truth he himself would have to come to terms with. 

Whew! Was that a big list or what?! As you can see, we have LOTS of new materials for you to choose from. If there’s something that you’d like that we don’t have, let us know! We can most likely get it for you! Either way, come and see us and check out what’s new at DC3 Library! 🙂

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