New Books!! 01/14/16

Welcome back, everyone! We hope you had a fantastic break. We have some new books ready to help you kick off Spring semester!

 

The Lost Tudor Princess by Alison Weir From New York Times bestselling author and acclaimed historian Alison Weir comes the first biography of Margaret Douglas, the beautiful, cunning niece of Henry VIII of England who used her sharp intelligence and covert power to influence the succession after the death of Elizabeth I.

Royal Tudor blood ran in her veins. Her mother was a queen, her father an earl, and she herself was the granddaughter, niece, cousin, and grandmother of monarchs. Lady Margaret Douglas, Countess of Lennox, was an important figure in the Tudor England, yet today, while her contemporaries – Anne Boleyn, Mary, Queen of Scots, Elizabeth I – have acheived celebrity status, she is largely forgotten.

Margaret’s life was steeped in intrigue, drama, and tragedy – from her auspicious birth in 1515 to her parents’ bitter divorce, from her ill-fated love affairs to her appointment as lady-in-waiting for four of Henry’s six wives. In an age when women were expected to stay out of the political arena, alluring and tempestuous Margaret helped orchestrate one of the most notorious marriages of the sixteenth century: that of her son Lord Darnley to Mary, Queen of Scots, Margaret defiantly warred with two queens – Mary, and Elizabeth of England – and was instrumental in securing the Stuart ascension to the throne of England for her grandson, James VI.

The life of Margaret Douglas spans five reigns and provides many missing links between the Tudor and Stuart dynasties. Drawing on decades of research and myriad original sources – including many of Margaret’s surviving letters – Alison Weir brings this captivating character out of the shadows and presents a strong, capable woman who operated effectively and fearlessly at the very highest levels of power.

 

Radioactive! In 1934, Irène Curie, working with her husband and fellow physicist, Frèdèric Joilot, made a discovery that forever altered the world: artificial radioactivity. This breakthrough allowed scientists to begin to alter elements and create new ones by changing the structure of atoms. Curie, a Frenchwoman, shared a Nobel Prize with her husband for their work. But when she was nominated to the French Academy of Sciences, the Academy not only denied her admission but also voted to disqualify all women from membership. Her exclusion from the academy marked Curie’s gradual erasure from the history of atomic science. 

Four years later, Curie’s breakthrough led physicist Lise Meitner to the scientific epiphany that unlocked the secret of nuclear fission. The Nobel committee ignored Metiner’s achievement in favor of her male research partner’s, but Meitner’s unique insight was critical to the revolution in science that led to nuclear energy and the race to build the atomic bomb.

With more than fifty period photographs and sidebars that help explain the related science, Radioactive! presents the story of two women still largely unknown despite their crucial contributions to world-changing discoveries.

 

Thicker Than Water by Kelly Fiore Cecilia Price killed her brother. At least, that’s what the police and the district attorney are saying. And although Cecelia is now locked up and forced into treatment, she knows the real story is much more complicated.

Cyrus wasn’t always the drug-addled monster he’d become. He was a successful athlete, but when an injury forced him off the soccer field and onto pain medication, his life became a blur of anger, addiction, and violence. All CeCe could do was stand by and watch, until she realized one effective way to take away her brother’s drugs while earning the money she needed for college: selling the pills.

Soon, CeCe becomes part drug dealer, part honor student. But even when all she wants is to make things right, she learns that sometimes the best intentions lead to the worst possible outcome. 

Thicker Than Water is an unforgettable dark, harrowing look into the disturbing truth of drug addiction and the desperate love of a sister watching her brother deteriorate before her eyes.

 

The Fight by Dan Bongino What events led a veteran Secret Service agent at the top of his profession, with no political experience, to resign his position and run for office, nearly pulling off the unlikeliest of upsets as a Republican in a deep-blue state? More important, what insight on issues from national and personal security to big politics can be gleaned from his successes as a Secret Service agent and failures in politics? As a former member of the elite Presiential Protection Division who served three presidents, bestselling author Dan Bongino is uniquely qualified to provide a view from behind the curtain to warn readers about the political system that is failing them, and the security future that won’t protect them.

The majority of Americans come into contact with security only when they fly or enter their workplace. They are rarely able to become acquainted with the politicians they know from robo-calls and TV ads. Bongino has experienced the inner workings of the national security apparatus and the failed political theater that we all feel but rarely understand. Using a mix of current events, an insider’s analysis, and tales from his time protecting the president, he shows where clear and foreseeable leadership failures from our current administration led to grave consequences. From a broken political process to a president who consistently misreads the American people, he shows us where America has gone wrong and how we can fight back.

 

The Lucky Years by David B. Agus, M.D.  In his first bestseller, The End of Illness, David Agus revealed how to add more vibrant years to your life by knowing the real facts of health. In this book, he builds on that theme by showing why this is the luckiest time yet to be alive, giving you the keys to a new kingdom of wellness.

In this new golden age, you’ll be able to take full advantage of the latest science and technologies to customize your care. Imagine being able to:

  • edit your DNA to increase a healthy lifespan
  • use simple technologies to avoid or control chronic conditions like pain, depression, high blood pressure, and diabetes
  • prolong natural fertility and have children in your forties
  • lose weight effortlessly without a trendy diet
  • reverse aging to look, feel, and physically be ten years younger
  • turn cancer into a manageable condition you can live with indefinitely

That’s the picture of the future that you can enter – starting today.

 

The Dressmaker’s War by Mary Chamberlain A powerful, riveting work of historical fiction, The Dressmaker’s War is the story of a brilliant English seamstress taken prisoner in Germany during World War II: about her perseverance, the choices she makes to stay alive, and the haunting aftermath of war.

London, 1939. Ada Vaughan is a young working-class woman with an unusual skill for dressmaking who dreams of opening her own atelier. When she meets Stanislaus von Lieben, a Hungarian aristocrat, a new, better life seems to arrive. Stanislaus sweeps Ada off her feet and brings her to Paris. But when war breaks out and Stanislaus vanishes, Ada is abandoned and alone, trapped on an increasingly dangerous continent.

Taken prisoner by the Germans, Ada does everything she can to survive. In the bleak horror of wartime Germany, Ada’s skill for creating beauty and glamour is the one thing that keeps her safe. But after the war attempting to rebuild her life in London, Ada finds that no one is interested in the messy truths of what happened to women like her. And though Ada thought she had left the war behind, her past eventually comes to light, with devastating consequences.

Gorgeously written and compulsively readable, The Dressmaker’s War introduces us to an unforgettable heroine – Ada Vaughn, a woman whose ambition for a better life ultimately comes at a heartbreaking cost.

 

UnSlut by Emily Lindin When Emily Lindin was eleven years old, she was branded a “slut” by the rest of her classmates. For the next few years of her life, she was bullied incessantly at school, after school, and online. At the time, Emily didn’t feel comfortable confiding in her parents or in the other adults in her life. But she did keep a diary. UnSlut presents that diary, word for word, along with new commentary from the Emily of today, providing fresh perspective and context (because Y2K, Hanson, and AOL Instant Messenger all now require some explaining).

Emily’s experiences will have relevance for readers whether they were bullied or did the bullying themselves (or both). From boring summer days to high-stress dances, thrilling kisses to dramatic breakups, and casual jokes to unforgivable insults, the diary offers a vivid, varied picture of adolescent life. And through Emily’s commentary, UnSlut also manages to engage deeply with the struggles and paradoxes of growing up female.

 

Firsts by Laurie Elizabeth Flynn Seventeen-year-old Mercedes Ayres has an open-door policy when it comes to her bedroom, but only if the guy fulfills a specific criterion: he has to be a virgin. Mercedes lets the boys get their awkward fumblings over with, and all she asks in return is that they give their girlfriends the perfect first time, the kind Mercedes never had herself.

Keeping what goes on in her bedroom a secret has been easy – so far. Her mother isn’t home nearly enough to know about Mercedes’ extracurricular activities, and her über-religious best friend, Angela, won’t even say the word sex until she gets married. But Mercedes doesn’t bank on Angela’s boyfriend finding out about her services and wanting a turn – or on Zach, who likes her for who she is instead of what she can do in bed.

When Mercedes’ perfect system falls apart, she has to find a way to salvage her own reputation – and figure out where her heart really belongs in the process.

Funny, smart, and true-to-life, Firsts is a one-of-a-kind young adult novel about growing up.

 

THESE BOOKS WILL BE OUT NEXT TUESDAY, JANUARY 19th:

 

The Road to Little Dribbling by Bill Bryson Twenty yearsago, Bill Bryson went on a trip around Britain to discover and celebrate that green and pleasant land. The result was Notes from a Small Island, a true classic and one of the bestselling travel books ever written. Now he has traveled about Britain again, by bus and train and rental car and on foot, to see what has changed – and what hasn’t.

Following (but not too closely) a route he dubs the Bryson Line, from Bognor Regis in the south to Cape Wrath in the north, by way of places few travelers ever get to at all, Bryson rediscovers the wondrously beautiful, magnificently eccentric, endearingly singular country that he both celebrates and, when called for, twits. With his matchless instinct for the funniest and quirkiest and his unerring eye for the idiotic, the bewildering, the appealing, and the ridiculous, he offers acute and perspective insights into all that is best and worst about Britain today.

Nothing is more entertaining than Bill Bryson on the road – and on a tear. The Road to Little Dribbling reaffirms his stature as a master of the travel narrative – and a really, really funny guy.

 

In a Different Key by John Donvan and Caren Zucker Nearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi, became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family’s odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism – by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different.

It is the story of women like Ruth Sullivan, who rebelled against a medical establishment that blamed cold and rejecting “refrigerator mothers” for causing autism; and of fathers who pushed scientists to dig harder for treatments. Many others played starring roles too: doctors like Leo Kanner, Tom Gilhool, who took the families’ battle for education to the courtroom; scientists who sparred over how to treat autism; and those with autism, like Temple Grandin, Alex Plank, and Ari Ne’eman, who explained their inner worlds and championed the philosophy of neurodiversity. 

This is also a story of fierce controversies – from the question of whether there is truly an autism “epidemic,” and whether vaccines played a part in it; to scandals involving “facilitated communication,” one of many treatments that have proved to be blind alleys; to stark disagreements about whether scientists should pursue a cure for autism. There are dark turns too: we learn about experimenters feeding LSD to children with autism, or shocking them with electricity to change their behavior; and the authors reveal compelling evidence that Hans Asperger, discoverer of the syndrome named after him, participated in the Nazi program that consigned disabled children to death.

By turns intimate and panoramic, In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and children were condemned to institutions to one in which a cadre of people with autism push not simply for inclusion but for a new understanding of autism: as difference rather than disability.

 

Feverborn by Karen Marie Moning In Karen Marie Moning’s latest installment of the epic #1 New York Times bestselling Fever series, Mac, Barrons, Ryodan, and Jada are back – and the stakes have never been higher or the chemistry hotter. Hurtling us into a realm of labyrinthine intrigue and consummate seduction, Feverborn is a riveting tale of ancient evil, lust, betrayal, forgiveness, and the redemptive power of love.

When the immortal Fae destroyed the ancient wall dividing the worlds of Man and Faery, the very fabric of the universe was damaged, and now Earth is vanishing bit by bit. Only the long-lost Song of Making – a haunting, dangerous melody that is the source of life itself – can save the planet.

But those who seek the mythic song must contend with old wounds and new enemies, passions that burn hot and hunger for vengeance that runs deep. THe challenges are many: the Keltar at war with nine immortals who’ve secretly ruled Dublin for eons, Mac and Jada hunted by the masses, the Seelie queen nowhere to be found, and the most powerful Unseelie prince in all creating determined to rule both Fae and Man. Now the task of solving the ancient riddle of the Song of Making falls to a band of deadly warriors divided among 0 and within – themselves.

Once a normal city possessing a touch of ancient magic, Dublin is now a treacherously magical city with only a touch of normal. And on those war-torn streets, Mac will come face-to-face with her most savage enemy yet: herself.

 

The Forgotten Room by Karen White, Beatriz Williams, and Lauren Willig 1945: When critically wounded Captain Cooper Ravenel is brought to a private hospital on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, young Dr. Kate Schuyler discovers a complex mystery that connects three generations of women in her family to a single extraordinary room in a Gilded Age mansion.

Who is the woman in Captain Ravenel’s miniature portrait who looks so much like Kate? And why is she wearing the ruby pendant handed down to Kate by her mother? In their pursuit of answers, tehy find themselves drawn into the turbulent stories of Olive Van Alan, driven in the Gilded Age from riches to rags, who hired out as a servant in the very house her father designed, and Lucy Young, who in the Jazz Age came from Brooklyn to Manhattan seeking the father she had never known. But are Kate and Cooper ready for the secrets that will be revealed in the Forgotten Room?

The Forgotten Room, set in multiple time periods, is  a sumptuous feast of a novel brought to vivid life by three brilliant storytellers.

 

If you saw something you liked, come on over and check it out! We’ll see you soon! 🙂

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